business & technology for wedding and lifestyle pros

Setting Up Your Server


After your domain name has been registered and you’ve chosen a hosting provider, the first thing that you will want to do is create email addresses.  A few addresses you may want to add:

[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]

You can choose to manage these email accounts through your hosting company’s email interface or manage the account through your personal internet email address or with Outlook.  I manage my blog email addresses through my personal Gmail account.  If you would like to do the same, visit Settings ? Accounts and Import in Gmail.  Choose ‘Send mail from another address’ and follow the prompts.

Your hosting provider should also give you instructions for setting up your first FTP user (if one was not already set up for you).

What is FTP?

FTP, or file transfer protocol, is the way that you upload and download files from your server.  Your hosting provider will give you access to a web FTP program that is good in a pinch, but to get the full power of FTP I recommend downloading one of the several free FTP programs available.  I personally use Core FTP, which you can download for free here.  In essence, what this program allows you to do is to transfer files back and forth from your computer to your server with one click.

To log in to your FTP program you will need the following information:

  • Host Name – a host name can be either your server name, your website address, or your IP address.  For ease, let’s use your website address.  So, my host name would be editandpost.com
  • Username – this is specified either by your hosting company or by you within your hosting company’s interface.
  • Password – also specified by you or your hosting company during setup.

The port for log in is typically 21 (verify with your hosting provider).  Your connection type is FTP.

Once you’ve logged in to your FTP program you should see a screen that looks a bit like this:

Core FTP Screenshot

Now you’re ready to rock and roll with FTP, you have email, and your server is a blank slate. Next in this series, we’re ready to install WordPress!

Chime In

3 comments on “Setting Up Your Server

  1. People St. Clair writes...

    I know this is the middle of the series but I have to say Thank you. I’ve been hesitant to transition to wordpress because it seemed a bit more technical than my own skill set but these step-by-step post have truly helped and have me starting to re-visit the thought of transitioning to wordpress again. I can’t wait for the next part of the series!

    • Ami writes...

      i’m so glad my dear! you are very welcome and as always, if there is something specific you are curious about let me know and i’ll try to blog it!

  2. Tenille writes...

    This scares me sooo much. Thank you for outlining the information in a clear and concise way. I’m still a little too chicken to try it right now but once I get this nasty thesis out of the way, I’ll be back and trying my very best to do this.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

TO TOP